Infusion

Infusing tea isn’t rocket science but like all good things in life a little care goes a long way to a better experience

water for tea

WATER

THE MOTHER OF TEA

An ancient Chinese proverb says that water is the “mother of tea”, so when making tea pay attention to the quality of the water you use as it has a major impact on the flavour.  To get the best results use freshly drawn filtered tap water or bottled spring water.  Mineral water is unsuitable as it can make the tea taste minerally.

teaspoon (1)

HOW MUCH TEA

A PERSONAL PREFERENCE

The amount of tea is down to personal preference.  If you like it strong add more, weak add less.  But from our experience most teas show their best with approximately 1 heaped teaspoon per 250ml of water, this is approximately 2.5 – 3g for most teas.  Some larger leaf teas and some herbal infusions need different amounts but we provide specific details on each of our retail bags.  Information is also provided on the product page in our shop

water temperature for tea

WATER TEMPERATURE

IMPORTANT FOR LIGHTER TEAS

Heating the water to the correct temperature is an important part of making good tea.  Pour boiling water all over your light green tea and you’ll find it tastes bitter, the hotter water will scald the leaves and bring out the bitter tasting tannins.  As an approximate guide green teas teas generally need water around 75-80°c, white teas 85°c, light oolongs 85°c, darker oolongs 90°c, black teas 90-100°c and most herbal infusions work best with water just off the boil.

Hot water for tea

GUESS THE TEMPERATURE?

GET THE CORRECT TEMPERATURE

There are a couple of ways to get correct water temperature.  The first is to buy a nifty thermostatically controlled kettle which you can set at the required temperature. The second way is to boil and cool for the following times to get approximate temperatures

2 mins – 90°c  3 mins – 85°  4 mins –  80°

5 mins – 75°c  6 mins – 70°c 

Another way is to add cold water to the leaves in the pot just before boiling.  Approximately 1/4 cold to 3/4 boiling water works well and brings the water temperature down so it doesn’t scald the leaves which can bring out those bitter tasting tannins.  This is best for lighter green and white teas.

TIMERS

INFUSION TIME

HOW LONG TO BREW

Infusion or brew times are also really important when using good quality loose leaf tea.  There are variables and again it is down to personal preference, but the general rule of thumb is the longer you leave your leaves to infuse past their optimum time the more bitter the tea will become.  All our bags have specific instructions which we initially advise you follow when making tea, this is generally the best for that tea.  But please play around with the infusion process, as some teas have lots to offer when varying infusion times and temperatures.

GUIDES

From White to Herbal, a simple guide to infusing each tea type

White Peony loose leaf tea

WHITE TEA

WHITE PEONY (BAI MU DAN)

AMOUNT: 2 heaped teaspoons (3.5g) per 250ml

WATER TEMP: 85°C (185°F)

INFUSION: 2 minutes

RE-INFUSION: 2-3 infusions increase time by 30 seconds each time

Sencha Green Tea

GREEN TEA

SENCHA GREEN (SHINCHA)

AMOUNT: 1 heaped teaspoons (3.5g) per 250ml

WATER TEMP: 80°C (175°F)

INFUSION: 2 minutes

RE-INFUSION: 2-3 infusions increase time by 30 seconds each time

Oolong loose leaf tea

OOLONG TEA

OOLONG (TIE GUAN YIN)

AMOUNT: 1 heaped teaspoons (3.5g) per 250ml

WATER TEMP: 85°C (185°F)

INFUSION: 3 minutes

RE-INFUSION: 2-3 infusions increase time by 30 seconds each time

Assam Loose Leaf Tea

BLACK TEA

ASSAM (MELENG)

AMOUNT: 1 heaped teaspoons (3.5g) per 250ml

WATER TEMP: 90°C (195°F)

INFUSION: 3 minutes

RE-INFUSION: 1-2 infusions increase time by 30 seconds for 2nd infusion

16 peppermint leaves

HERBAL & FRUIT

PEPPERMINT LEAVES

AMOUNT: 1 heaped teaspoons (2g) per 250ml

WATER TEMP: 100°C (212°F)

INFUSION: 5-8 minutes

RE-INFUSION: 1-2 infusions increase time by 30 seconds for 2nd infusion

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